GET IN TOUCH

Nurturing Curious Minds Through Creative Curriculum

Nurturing Curious Minds Through Creative Curriculum

Following the recommendation of the Durham Commision, the Arts Council and Freelands Foundation have funded a 3-year long programme supporting children to develop their creative capabilities. The programme is being run via 8 networks of schools across the UK, each exploring approaches to creative curriculum and teaching for creativity. In Nottingham, that lead school is Welbeck Primary, who set out with this mission question: 

How do we nurture our children’s innate creative capacities and sustain their curiosity about the world?”

Creative Collaboratives

Earlier this year, Digit Music were delighted to be selected as an arts delivery partner for the Nottingham Collaborative. We were contacted by Deputy Head, Jayne Thomas, at Old Basford School with a very particular request.
Year 4 were about to embark on a topic exploring Ted Hughes’ classic novel, The Iron Man, and tackle their KS2 science looking at sound waves. An absolute match made in heaven for us! Jayne wanted to create new ways of approaching the topic that would give her staff some inspiration, digital music skills and an ongoing resource for the future of creative curriculum at Old Basford School.

We wanted to look at sound design and recording foley with these primary school students to support this well-known children’s story, combining science, creativity and technology in the classroom.

Curious About Sounds

Over 3 weeks, we worked with over 60 children across Year 4, using instruments, objects and technology to get the children curious about sounds. We explored what sounds are, how we hear them and, using iPads and software, what sound waves look like. The children created their own soundwave signatures by recording their names. Using this knowledge, the children set off to predict scientific experiments. Best of all, they explored how to create and manipulate sounds to tell their own stories.
For their end of term performance, they broke down the Iron Man story into a script, which they scored by creating sounds in the classroom. They created their sound effects by recording found objects to mimic The Iron Man’s epic crash down the cliff, the sea and the sound of silence. All 60 children took turns to narrate the script with an iPad orchestra of 8 young people who performed the class’s recorded work.

Creative Curriculum

A Mainstay Of Creative Curriculum

Jayne now hopes that this sound composition and science project will become a mainstay activity within the school’s creative curriculum, to be repeated for future years. We hope that the children involved will remember bringing their Iron Man story to life, and stay curious about sound and science. Through a combination of literature, the science of sound and music technology, we hope that we were able to help answer the mission question that led this project from the very beginning. Hopefully, we will have left some digital music skills for life with some future musicians.

Get In Touch

If you’re interested in bringing a bespoke piece of creative curriculum to life through music, we’d love to hear from you. Please get in touch with us via email at learning@digitmusic.co.uk

We also offer a number of free learning resources for teachers via our record label, Digit Sounds, so be sure to check those out here. Finally, keep an eye out for our regular CPD-accredited sessions, in partnership with RSL. These are free and are part of our contribution to helping schools and music leaders to improve inclusion within creative curriculum and engage more young people in ensemble music making.

Following the recommendation of the Durham Commision, the Arts Council and Freelands Foundation have funded a 3-year long programme supporting children to develop their creative capabilities. The programme is being run via 8 networks of schools across the UK, each exploring approaches to creative curriculum and teaching for creativity. In Nottingham, that lead school is Welbeck Primary, who set out with this mission question:

“How do we nurture our children’s innate creative capacities and sustain their curiosity about the world?”

Creative Collaboratives

Earlier this year, Digit Music were delighted to be selected as an arts delivery partner for the Nottingham Collaborative. We were contacted by Deputy Head, Jayne Thomas, at Old Basford School with a very particular request.

Year 4 were about to embark on a topic exploring Ted Hughes’ classic novel, The Iron Man, and tackle their KS2 science looking at sound waves. An absolute match made in heaven for us! Jayne wanted to create new ways of approaching the topic that would give her staff some inspiration, digital music skills and an ongoing resource for the future of creative curriculum at Old Basford School.

We wanted to look at sound design and recording foley with these primary school students to support this well-known children’s story, combining science, creativity and technology in the classroom.

Curious About Sounds

Over 3 weeks, we worked with over 60 children across Year 4, using instruments, objects and technology to get the children curious about sounds. We explored what sounds are, how we hear them and, using iPads and software, what sound waves look like. The children created their own soundwave signatures by recording their names. Using this knowledge, the children set off to predict scientific experiments. Best of all, they explored how to create and manipulate sounds to tell their own stories.

For their end of term performance, they broke down the Iron Man story into a script, which they scored by creating sounds in the classroom. They created their sound effects by recording found objects to mimic The Iron Man’s epic crash down the cliff, the sea and the sound of silence. All 60 children took turns to narrate the script with an iPad orchestra of 8 young people who performed the class’s recorded work.

A Mainstay Of Creative Curriculum

Jayne now hopes that this sound composition and science project will become a mainstay activity within the school’s creative curriculum, to be repeated for future years. We hope that the children involved will remember bringing their Iron Man story to life, and stay curious about sound and science. Through a combination of literature, the science of sound and music technology, we hope that we were able to help answer the mission question that led this project from the very beginning. Hopefully, we will have left some digital music skills for life with some future musicians.

Get In Touch

If you’re interested in bringing a bespoke piece of creative curriculum to life through music, we’d love to hear from you. Please get in touch with us via email at learning@digitmusic.co.uk

We also offer a number of free learning resources for teachers via our record label, Digit Sounds, so be sure to check those out here. Finally, keep an eye out for our regular CPD-accredited sessions, in partnership with RSL. These are free and are part of our contribution to helping schools and music leaders to improve inclusion within creative curriculum and engage more young people in ensemble music making.

Related Articles

Accept Cookies

We use cookies to personalise content, provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. By using this website, you agree to the use of cookies as stipulated in our privacy policy.

Accept Cookies